Guest post: Revisiting Your Goals

Here is the latest article from Steven Jonas, MD, MPH. As you reflect on 2017, reflect on your racing season. Did you meet or exceed your goals? What can you do differently in 2018? — Du It For You

resolutions

The multisport racing season has come to a close in most parts of the country. Some of us are quite happy in the sport, know where we are going, look forward to next year and have possibly started to plan for it. But perhaps you have come to the point, after just one, two, or many years in the sport, where you’re not quite sure of your place in it.

To help you focus, to help you make sure that what you are doing is right for you, I would suggest that you think about the following questions: “Where am I now?” “What am I getting out of the sport?” “What, perhaps, am I not getting out of it that I thought I might?” “What should I be doing this winter?”

Whether you are gung ho for next year, or perhaps a doubting Thomas or Thomasina but still in an exploring mood, with these questions I am suggesting (surprise, surprise for those readers who know me) that first and foremost you take a look back at the goals you set for yourself, either last year or way back when. Did you come into multisport racing from a non-racing background out of curiosity, with the goal of simply satisfying it? Did you come into multisport from another racing sport in which you did well in terms of speed, looking to do well in this one also? Did you look at doing the sport as an opportunity to get into cross-training on a regular basis with the primary goal of improving your health and physical fitness, using racing as a motivator? Did you know something about multisport racing from a friend or two before starting out, and then say to yourself, “this looks like a good way to have fun?”

My bet is that whether your goals were one or more from the above list or not, if you are feeling good, feeling good about yourself, and feeling good about the sport, you most likely set an appropriate goal (or goals) for yourself and achieved it (them) in one way or another. I would also bet that if the opposite is true, you chose one or more inappropriate goals, in terms of your skill-level, available time, and life- balance. I suggest that you consider these ten words: “Do my goals work for me? Why and why not?”

For example, have you chosen the right multisport? If you really don’t like to swim and you have chosen triathlon for the “challenge” and you’re having fun, time to re-consider. There are duathletes who never touch the water and have a great, long, fun career in the two-sport variety.

If you are not inherently fast (like me) and you have chosen to engage simply to have fun (like me), and you are, you have achieved your goal. However, if you are not inherently fast but nevertheless have set as your goal going fast, and you spend hours on speed work getting nowhere, I suggest thinking again about why you are in the sport and perhaps change your focus to—that’s right—simply having fun.

To achieve the latter, you need train a lot less and a lot less intensely (just like I do). On the other hand, if you are doing speed work and you are picking up the pace (the good news) but feel like it’s something of a struggle (the bad news), you should take a look at your particular program and consider others, either in print or at a fall clinic. You might also consider hiring a personal coach.

And so, as the season comes to an end, I suggest that you take a deep breath, literally and figuratively. Life is long and so can your stay in multisport racing. From the beginning, setting out to have fun and while becoming a regular exerciser, going slowly all the time, I just finished my 35th season in tri/duathlon, having fun and exercising regularly the whole time. To repeat: The key to staying with it is to make sure that you set goals that work for you and work for you now. You should also know that as your life circumstances and your athletic abilities change, you can always change your goals and continue to stay—happily—in your sport of choice.

A version of this column originally appeared on the USAT blog in 2013 and is used with permission.

2017 marked Steve Jonas’ 35th season of multisport racing. He has done a total of 255 du’s and tri’s. He is a member of USA Triathlon’s Triathlon Century Club and is in the 90’s for duathlon. He has raced up to the ironman distance, but now at 81, he is sticking to the sprints in both duathlon and triathlon. Steve is a prolific author of books on multisport racing. His first (originally published in 1986), Triathloning for Ordinary Mortals®. The 2nd Ed. (New York: W.W. Norton, 2006) is still in print. In 2012, he published a book exclusively devoted to duathlon: Duathlon Training and Racing for Ordinary Mortals®: Getting Started and Staying with It (Guilford, CT: Globe Pequot Press/FalconGuides, 2012). All of his books on multisport are available at Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com. He is also long-time writer for various multisport periodicals, most recently, and happily, joining Du It For You.

Photo courtesy of Flickr

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4 thoughts on “Guest post: Revisiting Your Goals

  1. Pingback: Guest post: The Mental Aspects of Multisport Racing, Part 2 – Du It For You

  2. Pingback: Guest post: The Mental Aspects of Multisport Racing, Part 2 – Du It For You

  3. Pingback: Guest Post: Thoughts on the mental aspects of multisport racing, Part 1 – Du It For You

  4. Pingback: 2017 year in review: success in spite of myself – Du It For You

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