Guest post: Want a pretty medal? Wait for it.

Here’s another great column from legendary duathlon “mere mortal,” Dr. Steven Jonas. Funny he should bring up this very important topic. Last weekend, I volunteered for the Kaiser Permanente San Francisco Half Marathon, a race my running club, Pamakid Runners, puts on each year.

My teammates and I manned a booth at a local race expo. The number one question? What will the medals look like? It’s a beautiful, flat course? That’s nice. What about the medal? When can I see the medal? Can I buy a medal? Medals are a big deal in today’s running community. They’re also a big deal for age-groupers competing in big multisport events. Here’s Steve’s take on his well-earned inventory. Enjoy! –Du It For You

ITU Duathlon medal

Are you slow, but want to get a medal? Well, hang in there. Hey, you never know. I am a very lucky man to have found multi-sport racing. I reached the age of 46 having been able to do only two sports reasonably well. They were downhill skiing, which I got into during my first year of medical school at the age of 22, and sail-boating, which I got into in my 30s.

I fell in love with skiing on my very first day, even though I spent almost as much time down on the snow as I did actually standing up on my skis. But not being good at any of the usual school sports, I felt that I had finally discovered one I could do, if I took lessons and practiced. Eventually I did it well enough to become a Level I Certified Ski Instructor.

As for sailing, I was a good seaman and a safe sailor and just loved the “sailing sensation.” But I was never much at making my boat go fast in the club races I regularly entered. And in sailboat racing, if you’re not first, second, or third overall, fuhgeddaboudit (as we say in Noo Yawk). But then came triathlon, at age 46.

My-oh-my! Here was a racing sport which required only the ability to swim some distance, ride a bike, and then manage a run. My very first race was the 1983 Mighty Hamptons Triathlon at Sag Harbor, New York. In it, I discovered that unless you were fast, and competitive, it didn’t really matter where you finished, as long as you finished (and in my view, I did that happily and healthily, a phrase I coined the very next morning, when I went out for a little unwinding trot).

Then it just happened that my third race overall, held the following May, was what Dan Honig, the now-retired President of the New York Triathlon Club (nee Big Apples Triathlon Club) and I have concluded was the very first biathlon ever held. Dan thought up the event as a “season-extender” for multi-sport racing in our region. (FYI, “Biathlon” was the early name for our run-bike-run sport, before the application for inclusion of triathlon in the Olympics came up. Then, because biathlon is a winter Olympic sport consisting of cross-country skiing and target shooting, the Greek prefix was exchanged for the Latin one.)

Dan’s race was held at the old Floyd Bennett Field in Brooklyn. (That airfield, now long-closed, I had known in my New York City childhood as a Naval Air Station. Before that it was New York City’s first commercial airport.) For my first few years on both variants, that’s what it was in its entirety: racing for the pure fun of it.

But then, at what was already a relatively advanced age for getting into a new sport, in my region (New York Metropolitan Area), my age-cohort started to shrink a bit when I turned 50. And lo and behold, with the Mighty Hamptons back then giving age-group awards ten deep, I got my first award, an 8th, in 1987. I took my first age-group 3rd in 1991. I really started reeling them in in both duathlon and triathlon when I entered the 60-64 age group in 1996. Why? Was I going any faster? Why no. As I have gotten older, not one for speed-training, I have gotten steadily slower. But in this region, my age-cohort has continued to shrink while I have continued to race. Now 80, in my 35th year in the sport, I have 250-plus multi-sport races under my belt, including 90-plus du’s. At my age, I am almost guaranteed a plaque if I cross the finish line.

Would I still be racing if I weren’t getting plaques? Because I love the sport so much, I’m sure that I would. But I must admit that I do like getting them. That’s because I view them, for me, as a reward for staying with the sport for so long, especially since I am so slow (and now for the most part walking the run legs). And so, my message here is this: do you enjoy du-ing the Du for its own sake? Great! But even if you are slow like me, if you stay with run-bike-run long enough, you may eventually end up with some plaques too

*This column is based on one that originally appeared on the USAT blog and is used with permission.

2017 marks Steve Jonas’ 35th season of multi-sport racing. As of this writing, he has done a total of 255 du’s and tri’s. He is a member of USA Triathlon’s Triathlon Century Club and is in the 90s for duathlon. He has raced up to the ironman distance, but now at 80, he is sticking to the sprints in both duathlon and triathlon. Steve is a prolific author of books on multi-sport racing. His first (originally published in 1986) was Triathloning for Ordinary Mortals®. The 2nd Ed. (New York: W.W. Norton, 2006) is still in print. In 2012, he published a book exclusively devoted to duathlon: Duathlon Training and Racing for Ordinary Mortals®: Getting Started and Staying with It (Guilford, CT: Globe Pequot Press/FalconGuides, 2012). All of his books on multi-sport are available at Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com. He is also long-time writer for various multi-sport periodicals, most recently, and happily, joining Du It For You.

Advertisements

Motor Doping coming to 60 Minutes (Updated)

UPDATE: 60 Minutes aired “Enhancing the Bike,” its story about hidden motors in pro cycling, on January 29. Reporter Bill Whitaker did interview Istvan “Stefano” Varjas, inventor of a motor system. He said pro cyclists have used some version of his motor on “professional tours.”

Watch the full story, and read the transcript, here.

Stay tuned for another doping exposé! But this one’s not about TUEs or EPO. Bicycling magazine recently reported 60 Minutes producers are investigating professional cycling’s motor doping issue for an upcoming episode.

In June 2016, 60 Minutes correspondent Bill Whitaker visited Budapest, which is the home of Istvan “Stefano” Varjas, who claims to be the inventor of hidden motor systems that pro cyclists have allegedly used since 1999.

Varjas has hinted at a forthcoming exposé to more than one news outlet. Among other claims, he says pro riders have used hidden motors in Tour de France and other races for “years.” Varjas’s system is hidden in the wheels. Another product allegedly used, from Vivax, hides in the seat tube.

motor doping
Race officials caught a motor in the spare bike of Femke Van Den Driessche during the U23 cyclocross World Championships last year.

Both UCI and ITU use fraud software to detect these hidden motors. Varjas claims the technology is sub-par.

Read Bicycling‘s full account of the supposed 60 Minutes story and the motor doping issue here. For more on motor doping: what is is, how it’s done, and who’s accused of doing it, check out this article from Cycling Weekly.

If I could add something invisible to my bike, in light of all the rain we’ve gotten lately in Northern California, I would add an invisible, retractable rain shield to hover over and in front of myself and my bike. It might need invisible windshield wipers too. That way, I wouldn’t be stuck riding indoors. Like today.

Whether you’re running, riding or both, indoors or out, enjoy! Work on building up the only motor that matters — the one that powers your legs and your lungs.

Long Distance Duathlon European Championship returns to Germany

The European Triathlon Union announced the 2017 ETU Powerman Duathlon Long Distance European Championships return to Sankt Wendel, Germany. The event takes place May 21, 2017.

Powerman St. Wendel

Of course we are happy to welcome the European long distance Duathletes in Germany after we already hosted the standard distance Duathlon Championships in 2016,” said Matthias Zoll, CEO for Deutsche Triathlon Union. “St.Wendel, with its tradition as an excellent event organizer as they hosted already Worlds in duathlon and cross country cycling, is a perfect choice of ETU to guarantee a spectacular European Championship in 2017. We are also looking forward to St.Wendel as it will be also the start of the year where German Age Groupers can perform on home soil as the European Sprint Championships on 24th & 25th of June are just around the corner.”

As Zoll mentioned, Sankt Wendel hosted the 2005 and 2011 UCI Cyclocross World Championships. It hosted the ITU World Duathlon Championships in 1998.

European duathletes can start planning now for their national long-course event. Here in the U.S., the USAT Long Course Duathlon National Championship takes place May 14, 2017, in Cary, North Carolina.

Crazy me, my 2017 racing calendar includes a trip to Cary, NC, followed by a trip to Bend, Oregon for the standard course nationals on June 17, followed by the World Championships in Penticton, British Columbia, in August. I’m saving my dollars for this plan already!

Wherever you are, may you have a fun weekend of running-riding-running.

 

USA Triathlon Announces 2017 Calendar

Last week I talked about goal setting. This week I give you goals! USA Triathlon has announced its 2017 national championship calendar. Start planning now!

The season runs from January to November, so you have more than enough to choose from! Of note to duathletes, the duathlon long course nationals will take place again in Cary, North Carolina on April 29. The standard and sprint distance national champs will be held in Bend, Oregon in June (most likely late June), date TBA.

usatagncolympic2015bycruse0007a
photo by Rich Cruse, courtesy of USA Triathlon

These events qualify you for ITU World Championship events. The 2018 Multisport World Championships, site of the standard and sprint distance duathlons, will head to Odense, Denmark that year.

You can find the full national championship slate on USAT’s website.

What big races do you have planned for 2017? Tell us in the comments below!

My duathlon “A” race next year is the Duathlon World Championship (standard distance) in Penticton, BC. I also plan to compete in the National Championship in Bend, Oregon. I’ll call that an “A-” race goal!

Zofingen ITU Powerman Long Distance Duathlon Worlds-news from the U.S.

USA Triathlon reported that United States duathletes claimed two world titles and eight total medals at the Zofingen ITU Powerman Long Distance Duathlon World Championships in Zofingen, Switzerland last weekend.

Steve Sloan, from Berkeley, California (not far from yours truly in Oakland), earned gold for his 7:21:33 performance on the extremely long, difficult course. At age 19, Steve was also the youngest athlete in the race. He’s certainly got a long, successful career ahead of him.

Jenny Hay, from North Richland Hills, Texas, also topped her 20-24 age group with an impressive 10:42:46.

Read the USAT press release and get full results here.

I’m fascinated with Zofingen and intimidated by it. I’ve heard Ironman triathletes say it’s the hardest race they’ve ever done. Yikes! I think of the hilly 10K-150K-30K course as the pinnacle of our sport. When I talk to someone that’s finished Zofingen, my eyes get all big and I have to know more.

Soon, I hope to have my own stories to tell. My goal is to compete in this race before 2020. 2018 will be Powerman Zofingen’s 30th birthday. That could be my year!

ITU Combats Mechanical Doping

Triathletes and Duathletes can only rely on their body’s motor, not a motor hidden inside their bike, now that the International Triathlon Union (ITU) has licensed technological fraud software from Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) to combat mechanical doping in all events on the international triathlon calendar.

Last week ITU technical officials received training on UCI’s software, which uses magnetic resistance technology to detect fraud. Officials use an iPad mini to scan bikes for disruptions. Read all about the new announcement here.

UCI tested 600 bikes before the opening prologue of  Giro d’Italia. The organization said it planned to test 10,000 bikes this season.

Is mechanical doping a thing? It could be, but not yet. So far, only one cyclist has been caught with a hidden motor: Femke Van den Driessche at the 2016 Cyclocross World Championships.

Is it a thing with amateur athletes? It could be. Vivax, the company that manufactures the Vivax-Assist conversion kits, which can go unnoticed on a road bike, told Cyclist magazine that its customers were primarily people over 60 who were trying to keep up with riding partners.

moto-doping
100 to 200 watts for $2,000-$3,000? Not worth it.

I won’t go into a diatribe about cheating. There are plenty of essays and comments out there already that talk about all the reasons why cheaters embody the antithesis of what sport is about. Officials and the public have caught amateur athletes cutting marathon and Ironman courses and taking performance enhancing drugs to win road races and crits. The cheaters deprive true champions of medals, prize money, and on a professional level, possible sponsorship deals and more prize money. Boggles the mind.

Speaking of doping, I’m fixin’ to read (as they say in the south!) a story from ProPublica and the BBC where the former chief investigator of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) said WADA’s president thwarted his efforts to investigate state-sponsored doping in Russia. I’m sure it’s an interesting read. Let me know your thoughts.

And now, after all this doping talk, enjoy watching the Olympics! I caught much of the men’s road race today after a very long run in the Berkeley hills. I saw the race with more than 100K to go, took a nap, then saw the exciting, unexpected finish. (It was a long race!)

Whether you’re running, riding, or doing a bit of both, enjoy the rest of your weekend. And don’t feel bad if that guy or gal flies by you on a climb. He or she probably uses a hidden motor…right?