Lessons learned at Long Distance Duathlon Worlds

alistaireeckmantriathlete

The Long-Distance Duathlon World Championships was unique course and the toughest race I’ve ever done. It was not just the distance that made this race tough, but also the terrain. The race started with a 10km (6.2mi) run, then 150km (92mi) bike, and finished with a 30km (18.6mi) run. The race was held in Zofingen, Switzerland, which is about a 50-min drive outside Zurich.

The first run (10km run) was a two-loop course and it started off with a 1600m (mile) climb, where we climbed 115m (375ft) with an average grade of 6.5% grade and max grade of 20%. I didn’t get a good starting position because it was my 1st time racing Powerman Zofingen, and all the pre-race favorites got called up to the starting line first. This made it hard to stay in front since I lost contact with the pre-race favorites just a few minutes into run…

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Editorial – 2017 ITU World Duathlon Championships (Elite Standard Distance), Penticton BC

CANADIAN DUATHLON CENTRAL

First off, I want to thank all our readers for your patience while I took a very selfish year to myself with minimal writing. Secondly, thank you to you all in advance for reading this super long post. I didn’t want to spare a detail, so I included lots of pictures to break everything up!

I’ve just made my way back from Worlds in Penticton, where I raced the Elite Standard Duathlon last Saturday (spoiler – results here)…the reason for my selfish year. It was a roller coaster, and the gathering of duathletes from around Canada gave me a chance to talk to a lot of people that I knew previously to varying degrees. The number one piece of feedback I received from duathletes during my time in Penticton? Was it people asking for advice, training tips or wanting to know more about my journey to my first elite…

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#MSCBracebridge: Something bigger than myself

#MSCBracebridge: Something bigger than myself

Thank you for the report! Wishing you a gold medal day in Penticton!

The Chronicles of Coach Cruz

The Journey Continues

This race season has been quite the whirlwind! Rewinding a few paces back, in the still- wintry month of March when I was just starting to plan my race calendar, many would agree that I was pretty ambitious then. My partner, Jordan and I naturally have ongoing discussions about our life choices (mainly pertaining to training and racing) and always arrive at the same familiar, great big question: why do we keep doing this?

It’s hard to believe that this is only my second season of racing and I know that I still have a long way to go to reach my peak. I’ve decided on three “A races” this season:

  1. Ironman 70.3 Muskoka
  2. ITU Standard Duathlon MultiSport World Championships
  3. Niagara Falls Barrelman Bike/Run.

Keeping these three at the forefront of my training, I’ve added “B races” where I could practice “the essentials” (i.e. pacing, transition, and…

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#MSCWelland Race Report

#MSCWelland Race Report

Great job!

The Chronicles of Coach Cruz

Lights, Camera, ACTION!

This weekend (June 24/25) was MultiSport Canada’s Season Opener presented by Sketchers Performance in the beautiful city of Welland. A few days ago, I published in my pre-race report how excited I was about racing in the Rose City. I did a bit of research prior to the race and learned that Welland is not only a city rich with history going back as early as 1788, but is also home to the finest rose gardens in the Niagara Region thereby earning its name of Rose City. Naturally, this fun fact stuck with me on my way to the race venue and throughout my racing experience on Saturday.

If there is one word I can use to describe the venue, I would use the word STUNNING. The gorgeous Welland International Flatwater Centre, with the sunlight kissing its surface was the first thing I saw as I rolled…

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WHO HAS TO FIGHT THE LAW?

Excellent opinion piece from Toni Reavis. Doping isn’t merely cheating, he argues. It’s fraud.

Toni Reavis

i_fought_the_law_by_norealityallowedWhile the clock tells no lies, neither does it ask any questions. Instead it merely records our passing in cold indifference. And so in athletics’ ongoing fight to rid itself of the scourge of fraudulent performance the question arises, where does the responsibility for actually giving a damn lie? And, is drug testing in and of itself enough to achieve the goal?

I ask because based on the evidence of continued PED use, and the institutional corruption that allowed and benefited from it, one might conclude that the intended deterrence has not been achieved, and that some other stick or carrot may be required.

That thought was brought to mind yesterday while watching Alabama Senator Jeff Sessions appear at his confirmation hearing before Congress as Attorney General designate.  During one exchange Senator Sessions said the following in response to whether fraudulent speech is protected under the First Amendment to the…

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Guest post: Why Du the Du? An Introduction

Regular readers of this blog likely know what duathlons are, but if you are just coming into multisport racing, it might be helpful to go over the definition. Duathlons are distance races with three separate legs but two sports: running and cycling. They come in a variety of lengths from short to very, very long. And in that regard, do you know what, for a duathlete, is a crazy duathlete? Why one who has done a longer race than the longest one she or he has done.

Why tri the du? Let us count the ways. Whether you already do a distance sport, you are looking for a new challenge in your life. Or you want to try it because it looks like fun (and, done right, it is). You are a cyclist, or a runner, and whether you already race in your sport, the idea of combining it with the other one in a race intrigues you. You are interested in getting into what’s called cross-training; that is, training in more than one distance sport at the same time. Cross-training reduces your risk of sport-specific injury in any one of the sports because you are spending less time in each one. Coss-training can also reduce the boredom that can come with doing just one distance sport. And so, if you are cross-training, why not do the racing event it was originally designed for? Duathlon also provides a great excuse to buy some new toys — like a bike — especially for runners.

You may already be thinking about multi-sport racing, and you may well have heard about triathlon than duathlon. Yes indeed, you could try the tri for whatever reason or reasons pull your chain. But, let’s say that you don’t like to, want to, or just cannot, swim. Well then, it is definitely time to look at duathlon. Although there have been just run-bike events (and I did several of those years ago), the most common format is run-bike-run. There are four standard distances (although variants of them can be found to accommodate various course lengths and settings). There is what is generally called the super sprint, 2.5km run,10km cycle, 2.5km run, the sprint 5km run, 20km cycle, 5km run, standard distance: 10km run, 40km, 10km run, and a variety of truly long ones, like Powerman Zofingen, 10km run, 150km cycle, 30km run event, held in Switzerland.

So, if you are thinking about getting started in multisport racing but don’t like the idea of swimming, or you are a triathlete who is getting tired of training in the three sports, or you are looking for shorter combo events that are still a challenge but not as demanding as the usual triathlon, or you are most comfortable on the bike and perfectly happy to do the bulk of your training on it, or what have you, it might be time to “think duathlon.”

When duathlons were first developed by Dan Honig, President of New York Triathlon Club in the mid-1980s, the run-bike-run events were called “biathlons.” In the mid-90s the International Triathlon Union moved to get triathlon added to the Olympic Games. As many readers know, “biathlon” is also the name of the winter Olympic sport that combines cross-country skiing with target-shooting. Understandably, the winter biathlon people didn’t want another event in the Olympics associated with one that had the same name as theirs. So, by substituting the Latin prefix for the Greek one, the official name of the event was changed to “duathlon.” Whatever it is called, I do them on a regular basis throughout the season, and in my 35th season coming up, continue to do so.

By Steven Jonas, M.D., M.P.H.

This column is based upon an earlier column of mine, “Why Try the Tri and Why Do the Du?” which appeared on the USA-Triathlon Blog on April 25, 2013. It is used with permission.

Race director celebrates 3 years cancer-clear

I’m sharing this story because it’s good news (and we could all use more of that these days) and because it’s good advice for staying all-around healthy.

Gary Westlund, a coach, race director, and founder of Charities Challenge, a nonprofit that puts on a host of running and walking programs in Minnesota, is celebrating three years clear of melanoma.

Fortunately, Gary caught the cancer early. A mole on his left knee looked suspicious. He immediately visited his doctor, who performed a biopsy and confirmed his suspicions.

Gary’s story is a good reminder to:

Wear sunscreen.

Check your skin monthly for possible melanoma. (If it’s oddly shaped, has an uneven color, or if it gets bigger or changes over a period of weeks or months, get it checked.)

Visit a dermatologist annually for a “mole check.”

Gary also reminds us that even though we stay fit with running and cycling (and more running), we may not be overall, full-spectrum healthy. Proper nutrition doesn’t just fuel your training and races, it also helps keep your blood pressure and cholesterol in check. If you have a family history of heart disease, keep an eye on your numbers.

And remember to have fun and enjoy life, even when you’re off the bike and not on a run.

See you soon!